Ottawa

Britannia Canoe Club House

Britannia Canoe Club.jpg

Website: 

byc.ca/index.php/home/about-britannia-yacht-club/byc-history

Overview: 

Address: End of the Ottawa Electric Pier, Brittania Boat Club

Britannia Yacht Club has its roots as an association of cottagers who spent their summers at Britannia-on-the-Bay. What was known as the Britannia Aquatic Club was formed in 1887 and met for the first nine years in an old saw mill on the water between Rowatt and Jamieson Streets. The name was changed to the Britannia Nautical Club and then to the Britannia Boat House Club, and was incorporated in 1895. The following year the members built a fine building for storing their canoes and rowboats. The club flourished and paddlers won many national championships. Frank Amyot won a gold medal for Canada at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

The members decided that they would like a larger, more elegant place to hold their dances and other social functions. A new clubhouse was built in 1907 on the end of the Ottawa Electric Railway pier at Britannia Park, but was unfortunately destroyed by fire in August 1918. The social affairs of the club were then moved back to the old clubhouse and remain in the same building to this day. At this point the club was known as the Britannia Boating Club.

Gradually paddling declined and we became a sailing club with a few motorboats. Membership reached a peak of 2000 people just prior to the First World War, but dropped off dramatically after the war. With the advent of fiberglass boats, which require far less maintenance than wooden ones, the numbers rose once again about forty years ago.

"History of Brittania Yacht Club Ottawa". Brittania Yacht Club. 2018. byc.ca/index.php/home/about-britannia-yacht-club/byc-history

Type: 

Multi-use

Tag this record

From: 

1907

To: 

1918

Current Status: 

Britannia Yacht Club

Location: 

Unlocated site, Ottawa, Carleton (carlotta00_000)

Venue Views: 

Britannia Boathouse Clubhouse

Britannia Clubhouse Fire - Morning Leader - Aug. 31, 1918 - P.5


Capitol Theatre Ottawa

Capitol Cinema.png

Dey’s Arena

Overview: 

Address: 110 Laurier Ave W.

The Arena, also known as  Dey's Arena was an arena for ice hockey located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. It was the home of the Ottawa Hockey Club from 1908 to 1923. It was the third in a series of ice hockey venues built by the Dey family of Ottawa. At the time of its building, it was Canada's largest arena.  

History 

The arena was built in 1907 and was built because audiences for hockey matches had out-grown the previous arena, known as Dey's Rink or Dey's Arena. The spectator capacity was 7,000, of which 2,500 was standing room. 'The Arena', as it was called, was built on leased land at Laurier Avenue at the Rideau Canal, on the location of today's Confederation Park, near the current Ottawa city hall. This is very close to the location of the first Dey's Rink, which was located on the opposite bank of the Canal. It is also close to the location of the Royal Rink at 28 Slater, which was where the Ottawa Hockey Club first practised in 1883. The land for The Arena was leased from landowner Esther Sherwood for the rate of $166.66 per month, for twenty years. The Arena opened on January 11, 1908 for a game between Ottawa and the Montreal Wanderers, the top rivalry of the day. The last Senators game at the arena was held on March 10, 1923, after which the team moved to the Ottawa Auditorium. The Ottawa Auditorium was also built by the Deys, who were part owners of the Ottawa Senators. This third rink was torn down by the federal government at the end of the lease in 1927 to make way for the ceremonial 'Driveway' improvement project along the Rideau Canal. The Arena was used for the sports of ice skating and figure skating as well as hockey. The 1912 Canadian Figure Skating Championships were held in February 1912 at the Arena. The Arena hosted the 1910 and 1911 Stanley Cup challenges, and the 1920 Stanley Cup Finals, all won by the Ottawa Senators. (The 1921 and 1923 Ottawa Stanley Cup wins were won out west.)  

Building 

The Arena was a large improvement internally from the previous Dey Arena. The dressing rooms, rest rooms, smoking rooms and lobby were steam-heated. The main doors were on Laurier Avenue, and a north entrance existed onto Slater Street, which at the time extended to the Canal. The exterior was simple, and did not meet Sherwood's lease criteria of a 'worthy architectural feature' of Ottawa. At its building, it was the largest ice arena in Canada.  

Ice surface 

The Arena ice surface (natural) was unusually shaped. Both ends are curved, with no straight sections behind the net. This design was passed along to the successor Ottawa Auditorium ice surface design.

"The Arena, Ottawa." OpenBuildings. Accessed 10 Jul 2017. openbuildings.com/buildings/the-arena-ottawa-profile-18169

Type: 


From: 

1908

To: 

1923

Location: 

Unlocated site, Ottawa, Carleton (carlotta00_000)


Her Majesty’s

Address: 

A local syndicate soon found the cash to put up a $7,500 playhouse on Wellington Street near O'Connor Street, calling it Her Majesty's and opening it to the public on 4 October 1856. Under this Metropolitan Dramatic Association classics such as Richelieu were presented there as well as amateur productions such as To Prescott and Back for Five Shillings. (pp. 242)

Fairfield, Robert. "Theatres and Performance Halls." Early Stages: Theatre in Ontario 1800-1914. Editor Ann Saddlemyer. University of Toronto, 1990. pp. 214-287.


Rideau Hall


Russell Theatre

Russell Theatre - exterior

Russell Theatre - exterior

Russell Theatre - interior

Russell Theatre - interior

Russell Theatre - ceiling

Russell Theatre - ceiling

It was not until the Russell Theatre opened on 15 October 1897 with the comic opera Kismet or the Two Tangled Turks, that Ottawa at last had a theatre of distinction. Adjoining the Russell Hotel at the corner of Queen and Elgin streets, the Russall had a seating capacity of 1,600, according to Cahn's Theatrical Guide of 1899-1900, although 1,500 may have been a more likely figure. 

Patrons approached the Russell's arched main entrance from Queen Street. Moving through an environment of Italianate murals, tile mosaic floors, art glass, brass electroliers, and polished mahogany woodwork, they reached the entrance lobby where a gilded plaster bust of Queen Victoria looked down on all who gathered there. Two wide doors gave directly to an inner lobby from which stairs ascended each side to the balcony, family circle, and the gods. Two heavily draped portals opened to the orchestra seating, all upholstered in cardinal-red velour. A contemporary description of the auditorium tells us that 'the colour scheme on the walls is carmine, shading off to lighter tints. On the ceiling below the first balcony on entering the doors from the pit, one sees a beautiful figure design entitled "Psyche's Dream." On the sounding board are also three figures representing "Drama," "Music," and "Art." The remainder of the mural decoration consists of the chaste, simple and graceful borders of the style of the Italian Renaissance' (Ottawa Citizen, 16 October 1897). An early photograph of the audiorium fails to show Frederick Challeneer's great mural on the sounding board, 'The Triumph of Drama,' but it does show the house drop on whihc a lesser artist had laboured over a gigancitc scene of a CPR right of way in the Rocky Mountains.

There were five boxes on each side of the house arranged in two tiers of two boxes each with a larger box on a level above, from which one could not likely see much of the stage. All the boxes were semicircular in plan, since they protruded into the auditorium, and all were heavily embellished in ornamental plaster designed to give visual impact but happily providing good sound reflection properties as well, to the benefit of those seated further from the stage.

The Russell's proscenium opening measured thirty-two fee square, and according to the contemporary Cahn Theatrical Guide, the liberally trapped stage was a respectable forty feet from foots to back wall and sixty-five feet between the side walls. The height of the rigging loft above the stage was sixty-four feet with a distance between fly girders of forty-eight feet. On the day it first opened, this substantial and well-appointed theatre had enough stock scenery to make up fifty scenes. 

As happened to so much of Ottawas earlier architecture, fire destroyed the Russell in 1901; it was promptly rebuilt, surviving until the spring of 1928, when it was pulled down because it stood in the way of progress on the nation's largest roundabout, Confederation Square (pp. 242-243).

Fairfield, Robert. "Theatres and Performance Halls." Early Stages: Theatre in Ontario 1800-1914. Editor Ann Saddlemyer. University of Toronto, 1990. pp. 214-287.

Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1897

To: 

1928

Location: 

Unlocated site, Ottawa, Carleton (carlotta00_000)

Venue Views: 

Russell Theatre Exterior

Image Date

1920

"Russell Theatre" Ottawa past & present. 21 May 2013. Accessed 10 July 2017. www.pastottawa.com/?menu=keyword&keyword_id=614&keyword=russell-threatre

Russell Theatre Interior - 1928

Image Date

1928

Powell, James. "Russell Theatre." Today in Ottawa History. 18 March 2017. Accessed 10 July 2017. todayinottawashistory.wordpress.com/2017/03/18/the-russell-theatre/

Russell Theatre Ceiling

Image Date

1928

Powell, James. "Russell Theatre." Today in Ottawa History. 18 March 2017. Accessed 10 July 2017. todayinottawashistory.wordpress.com/2017/03/18/the-russell-theatre/


The Dominion

Also Known As: Bennett's Theatre

Bennett's vaudeville theatre, which opened in December 1906, introduced regular showings of moving pictures to Ottawa under the patronage of the Governor General, Lady Laurier and the Mayor. Although the movies were only a minor attraction on the bill, the Journal reviewer enthused that they were "the best ever shown in Ottawa." ("Opening") He was also fulsome in his description of the new theatre's interior, which he judged as

handsome — decorated with many beautiful paintings and scenic effects. Decorative effects in entrance are of Pompeian style with Bacchante figures worked out to advantage. In the dome of the main part of the ceiling, the paintings are magnificent, being worked out in old Italian style. The centre figure represents music, with a fairy dancer on one side and on the other figures representing music.

The paintings were the work of Frank Righetti of New York, and the theatre's architect was E. C. Horn. In addition, the theatre provided 18 exits, a ladies' parlour with a "courteous maid," writing material and recent magazines for waiting patrons, and a telephone messenger service (Programme).  For the next 14 years this theatre, renamed the Dominion when the Bennett circuit expired, was Ottawa's "number one" vaudeville house.

Works Cited

"Opening of New Theatre," Ottawa Journal, 11 December 1906, p. 5

Programme, Bennett's Theatre, Ottawa, 8 April 1907, in PAC Library

From: 

1906

To: 

1921