Kingston

Atheneum

Overview: 

Address: 

"By the time the Atheneum Theatre, established in a new room nexxt door to the British Whig on Bagot Street, opened its doors in 1841..." (pp. 217)

Fairfield, Robert. "Theatres and Performance Halls." Early Stages: Theatre in Ontario 1800-1914. University of Toronto Press, 1990. pp. 214-287.

"2, 3 September 1841, Kingston: Opening of Atheneum with Grand Dramatic Concert' by Mrs Fitzwilliam." (pp.299)

Plant, Richard. "Chronology: Theatre in Ontario to 1914." Early Stages: Theatre in Ontario 1800-1914. University of Toronto Press, 1990. pp. 288-346.


Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1841

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)


Frontenac County Court House

Overview: 

Address: 1 Court Street

DESCRIPTION OF HISTORIC PLACE

Frontenac County Court House National Historic Site of Canada is a large, limestone court house, built in the mid-19th century in the Neoclassical style. Its imposing columned portico and dome overlook a wide expanse of park to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. It is located in a downtown residential area of 19th-century homes, adjacent to Queen’s University, in the city of Kingston. The formal recognition consists of the building on its legal property at the time of designation.

HERITAGE VALUE

Frontenac County Court House was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1980 because: 

- it is representative of a significant functional type;

- it features many of the traditional exterior elements of large-scale mid-19th century court houses. 

Frontenac County Court House is representative of the large-scale, court houses erected in Ontario after 1850. The passage of the Municipal Act gave increased power to county government, justifying the construction of court houses on a monumental scale to accommodate multiple county functions. The Frontenac County Court House is one of several surviving court houses built during the boom in court house construction from 1852 to 1856. Designed by architect Edward Horsey, the building’s elaborate façade, comprised of a central portico, flanking wings and domed cupola, and the elaborate mix of Italianate and classical detailing, are typical of mid-19th century Ontario judicial buildings. The court house was rebuilt by architect John Power and contractor George Newlands in 1874 following a fire. The only significant exterior change was the central dome, which was given added height and emphasis.

Source: Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, Minutes, March 1980.

CHARACTER-DEFINING ELEMENTS

Key elements which relate to the heritage value of the Frontenac County Court House include:

- its monumental scale;

- its exterior features typical of large-scale, mid 19th-century court houses, including classical detailing and composition, a bold portico, and a domed cupola;

- its Neoclassical style, evident in its form, composition and detailing;

- its symmetrical composition, consisting of a centre pavilion with central dome and pedimented portico;

- flanking end pavilions terminating in projecting bays with diminished and responsive pediments;

- regularly placed window and door openings;

- the features added in 1874, including the domed cupola resting on a drum composed of sixteen arched windows and cupolas on the end pavilions;

- the grand, pedimented portico, with frieze, cornice, Ionic columns, pilasters, coffered ceiling, and tympanum with the county court of arms;

- its sophisticated mix of Italianate and classical detailing

- its construction of local limestone;

- the surviving nineteenth-century elements of its interior plan and decorative finishes;

- the features of its site, including, the broad expanse of gently inclined, landscaped lawn fronting the courthouse; and the centrally placed stone fountain.

"Frontenac County Court House Historic Site of Canada" Canada's Historic Places. Parks Canada. Accessed 26 Jun 2017. www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=12033

From: 

1858

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)

Venue Views: 

General View of the Frontenac County Court House


Grand Opera House

Website: 

www.kingstongrand.ca

Overview: 

Address: 218 Princess St., Kingston ON

Also Known as the Grand Opera House, Martin's Opera House

Originally the Grand Opera House, built 1901-2 on the site of Martin's Opera House (1879). H.M.S. Parliament and the premiere of Leo, the Royal Cadet were given at Martin's Opera House, which also saw visits from John Philip Sousa, Oscar Wilde, and others before it was destroyed by fire 6 Dec 1898. The Grand opened 14 Jan 1902 and was bought in 1905 by Ambrose J. Small, a theatre-chain owner who had been influential in its original planning. Bernhardt, Melba, and Jolson performed there. In 1936 it was bought by Famous Players, and it reopened as a movie house 20 May 1938, but closed again in 1961. The Kingston Arts Council campaigned for its restoration as a civic theatre, and as the Grand Theatre it opened 20 May 1966 with a performance of Spring Thaw. Its new mandate was to accommodate touring and local groups and serve as the home of the Kingston Symphony. It had 832 seats, a proscenium stage, and an orchestra pit. Renovations begun in 1978 provided new lounges, improved backstage facilities, and a second smaller theatre space, The Baby Grand, which opened in November 1990. 

Further restorations were undertaken in 2004-08 to include expansion of The Baby Grand, new lounges, full orchestra pit with mechanical lift, acoustic towers, an orchestra shell, 35 moveable seats in the main auditorium, improved lighting and safety systems and a multi-purpose room under the stage as well as enhancements to the external façade.

Beharriell, Patricia. "Grand Theatre." Historica Canada. Last edited 4 Mar 2015. Accessed 27 Jun 2017. www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/grand-theatre-emc/

Type: 

Music Hall

From: 

1902

Current Status: 

The Grand Theatre Kingston

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)


HMS Niagara

Overview: 

Also Known As HMS Royal George

"HMS Royal George was a 20-gun ship of the Provincial Marine. She carried a crew of 200 and had been launched at the royal naval dockyard in Kingston in July 1809. 

By November 1812 she was the largest warship afloat on Lake Ontario. Her captain was Commodore Hugh Earle."

Lea, Michael. "When Kingston was on the frontlines." Kingston Whig. 9 Nov 2012. Accessed 26 Jun 2017. www.thewhig.com/2012/11/09/when-kingston-was-on-the-frontlines

" History

She was launched at the Kingston Royal Naval Dockyard in Kingston, Ontario, in July 1809. Royal George was renamed Niagara in 1814 and was sold in 1837." 

"HMS Royal George (1809)." revolvy.com. Accessed 26 Jun 2017. www.revolvy.com/topic/HMS%20Royal%20George%20(1809)&item_type=topic

Type: 

Boat

From: 

1809

To: 

1837

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)

Venue Views: 

A ship playing role of HMS Royal George, left, exchanges fire with an American ship during a reenactment of the Fight of the Royal George, November 9, 2012.

Image Date

2012


J. Meagher’s Hotel


Kingston City Hall

Kingston City Hall.jpg

Website: 

https://www.cityofkingston.ca/explore/culture-history/history/city-hall

Overview: 

 Here are a few quick facts about Kingston's City Hall National Historic site.

June 15, 1842, the town of Kingston publicized a competition for architects and builders for the design for a Town Hall and Market. The probable cost of construction was set at 10,000 pounds.

The design of the government architect George Browne (31 years old) was selected from the 12 submissions received from the contest. George Browne also designed the Mowat Building, the Victoria and Grey Trust Building, the S&R Department Store, the Presbyterian Manse and Rockwood Villa

The building was completed in December 1844, at a final cost slightly in excess of 25,000 pounds. The increased cost was due to additions and changes from the competition submission.

The original design of City Hall had a hemispherical dome with no clock faces or belfry. The belfry and clock were housed in a large square end block that originally extended the market wing all the way to King Street. The market wing end block was destroyed in a fire on Jan. 10, 1865. The original clock that had been given jointly by John Counter and John A. Macdonald was moved to the main dome.

The Governor General Sir Charles Metcalf laid the City Hall corner stone June 5, 1843.

Past tenants of City Hall include the Market Vendors, the Board of Trade, the Post Office, the Customs House, the Bank of British North America, the Mechanics Institute, the Orange Lodge, the Masons, the Merchants Exchange, A&D Shaw Dry Goods, various church groups, a saloon and some residential tenants.

After his death in 1891, the body of Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's first prime minister and one-time Kingston alderman, lay in state in what is now Memorial Hall, an impressive chamber dedicated in 1921 to honour the city's war dead.

In 1908 the cupola on top of the dome and part of the dome burned, the cupola was rebuilt in May 1909 and the new Seth Thomas clock and a new bell was installed. The 1908 clock and bell are the current clock and bell that are present in the dome today.

In 2002 a new copper roof and clock tower reconstruction commenced along with phase-one of the masonry restoration. All four clocks were removed so that the stained glass faces could be repaired.

"Historic City Hall." City of Kingston. Corporation of the City of Kingston. www.cityofkingston.ca/explore/culture-history/history/city-hall

Type: 

Multi-use

From: 

1844

Current Status: 

Kingston City Hall

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)

Venue Views: 

Kingston City Hall


Poncet’s Inn


St. George’s Cathedral

Address: 270 King St. E


Website: 

http://www.stgeorgescathedral.ca/index.cfm/home/

Overview: 

Prior to 1825, St George's church was located on a different site. The first St. George's church was built in 1792 and was a wooden structure across from what is today the Kingston Market Square. 

Construction of a new building on the present site started in 1825. It was a rectangular stone structure designed by Thomas Rogers. The walls of this church form the nave of the present Cathedram from the main entrance to the dome. 

Between 1838 and 1840 the church was englarded and the protico with Dorico columns was added. 

In 1865 St. George's Hall, designed by John Power was built. Between 1891and 1894 John Power's son Joseph designed the extended chance, the dome and the gallaried transpets for enlargement of the church. 

In 1899 on New Year's Day the building was destroyed by a fire, but was rebuilt by 1900  and was only renovated by Neil Maclennan in 1975. 

“St George's Cathedral.” A St George's Cathedral Timeline - St George's Cathedral, St. George's Cathedral, www.stgeorgescathedral.ca/index.cfm/history-architecture/a-st-georgee280....

Tag this record

Type: 

Multi-use

From: 

1825

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)

Venue Views: 

St. George's Cathedral's dome and portico

Coffered ceiling in the apse of St. George's Cathedral


Theatre in the Tete de Pont Barracks

Tete de Pont Barracks.jpg

Overview: 

"At Kingston, according to the Whig Standard of 3 August 1946, Imperial Army officers first presented amateur performances in a small theatre at the Freemasons' Tavern near the Tete du Pont barracks in the 1790s and until the building of Walkers hotel in 1807, when the latter presumably offered better facilities for concerts and private theatricals." (pp. 216)

Fairfield, Robert. "Theatres and Performance Halls." Early Stages: Theatre in Ontario 1800-1914. Edited by Ann Saddlemyer. University of Toronto Press, 1990. pp. 214-287.

Type: 

Theatre

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)

Venue Views: 

Tete de Pont Barracks, Kingston, Canada

Image Date

1910

Mahood Brothers, "Tete de Pont Barracks, Kingston, Canada.". Picture. 1910. Virtual Reference Library. Toronto Reference Library, Baldwin Collection, PC-ON 980. www.virtualreferencelibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDMDC-PCR-989&R=DC-PCR-989&searchPageType=vrl


Theatre Royal Kingston

Overview: 

"By the time the Atheneum Theatre, established in a new room next dooor to the British Whig on Bagot Street, opened its doors in 1841, we may assume the earlier novely of theatre had given way to the orderly and easy decorum of a well-mannered theatre-going citizenry at Kingston. Two years later a two-storey frame building was erected at the corner of Montreal and Queen streets on which was kown as the Theatre Royal until it burned to ashes on 8 January 1851, after which its productions moved to Kingston's splendid new Town Hall." (pp.217)

Fairfield, Robert. "Theatres and Performance Halls." Early Stages: Theatre in Ontario 1800-1914. Edited by Ann Saddlemyer. University of Toronto Press, 1990. pp. 214-287.

Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1843

To: 

1851

Location: 

Unlocated site, Kingston, Frontenac (fronking00_000)