Hamilton

Barton Street Methodist Church

Overview: 

Address: 543 Barton St. E (pp.11)

City of Hamilton Twenty-Seventh Annual Street, Alphabetical, General, Miscellaneousand Classified Business for the Year 1900. W. H. Irwin, 1900, www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780506_p1.pdf

Type: 

Church

Location: 

Barton Street Methodist Church, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_001)


Capitol Theatre

Overview: 

Address: 103 King St. East, Hamilton ON

Built in 1917 as Loew's Theatre, the building offered 2,259 seats and was the largest venue in Hamilton in its day. Originally a vaudeville house, it transitioned to a movie palace and was owned by the Famous Players chain between 1930 and 1946 when it was taken over by the Odeon company, renovated and renamed the Capitol.

The original auditorium was demolished after the cinema closed in 1971. What remains, the part Hartley and company are reviving, is the entrance lobby that stretched over an alley that runs parallel to King and King William streets"

Arnold, Steve. "Capitol revitalization capitalizes on Hamilton condos." Hamilton Spectator. 4 Jan 2016. Accessed 26 Jun 2017. www.thespec.com/news-story/6216663-capitol-revitalization-capitalizes-on-hamilton-condos/

Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1917

To: 

1973


Hamilton Congregational Church

VenueListID: 

793

Overview: 

Address: 88 Hughson Street


Mitchell & Co.'s County of Wentworth and Hamilton City Directory for 1865-66. Mitchell & Co: 1866. pp.23. Canadian Directories Collection. Library and Archives Canada. www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780513_p1.pdf 

City of Hamilton Directory For 1871-72. Published Annually. Containing Complete Alphabetical, Classified Business, and Street Directories. J Sutherland: 1871. pp. 35.Canadian Directories Collection. Library and Archives Canada. www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780515_p1.pdf

Type: 

Church


Location: 

Congregational Church, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_002)


Good Templar Hall (Temperance Hall)

VenueListID: 

792


Overview: 

Address: 1 King St. W

"Good Templars... 

Hamilton Lodge, No.9, was organized May 12, 1854, and numbers around 400 members. Meets every Friday, at the Temperance Hall, King Street." (pp.29)

1858 City of Hamilton Directory. William A. Shepherd: 1858. Canadian Directories Collection, Library and Archives Canada. www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780510_p1.pdf


Type: 

Multi-use

Location: 

Good Templar Hall (Temperance Hall), Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_003)


Grand Opera House

Grand Opera House - Hamilton.png

Overview: 

Address: 102 James St. N

Grand Opera House

"This first-class theatre building, which opened in 1880, was constructed for $25,000. The architect George H. Lalor spared no expense on the building, which drew international stars to its stage. The Opera House attracted such crowds that it underwent several overhauls and expansions in ensuing years. But by the 1930s, interest had begun to wane. Finally, it was shuttered in 1961. Today, the site contains a strip mall."


Hamilton Spectator. "Vanished Hamilton: A litany of loss." Hamilton Spectator. 17 Feb. 2013,

www.thespec.com/news-story/2206326-vanished-hamilton-a-litany-of-loss/

"Based on a theatre design of an existing theatre in Toronto, the Grand Opera House opened to the public on November 29, 1880. It had cost $25,000 and was a combination of Gothic and Eastlake styles. The theatre was designed to seat 1,169 people. Many famous acts appeared at the Grand Opera House including comedians, tragedians, ballerinas, opera stars to name only a few.

It was one of the houses on the Vaudeville circuit between Buffalo and Toronto so it was always busy. As Vaudeville declined as the movies flourished the Grand Opera House also declined. In 1926 a fire destroyed the stage, scenery, orchestral equipment and fly-gallery. From the 1930s onward it was in a steady decline as a live venue and was turned into a movie theatre. It became the Grand in 1937, the Granada in 1937 and the Downtown Theatre in 1951. The building was finally closed on November 1, 1961 and demolished." 

"Grand Opera House Interior". Flickr, Hamilton Public Library, 15 May 2013,

www.flickr.com/photos/hamiltonpubliclibrary/9045408280


Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1880

To: 

1961

Location: 

Grand Opera House, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_004)

Venue Views: 

Grand Opera House Interior


Hamilton Institute of Young Franklin's Hall

VenueListID: 

794

Overview: 

Address: 100 King St. E (pp.20)

Sutherland & co. Hamilton City Directory for 1866. Sutherland & Co, 1866.

www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780511_p2.pdf

Located above D. Moore and Co. (pp.168)

Kristofferson, Robert B. Craft Capitalism: Craftsworkers and Early Industrialization in Hamilton, Ontario. University of Toronto Press, 2007.


Type: 

Multi-use

Location: 

Hamilton institute of young franklins hall, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_005)


Lyric Theatre

Century Theatre Hamilton.jpg

Overview: 

Address: 14 Mary Street

The 2300-seat Lyric Theatre opened in 1913 as a vaudeville and motion-picture house. The theatre was named as the result of a promotional contest where $200 in gold was the prize for the best name. Eighty Hamiltonians suggested the name, Lyric, and the prize was split among them, each receiving $2.50.

The Renaissance Revival style theatre was converted to Hamilton's first movie studio in 1920, and again renovated in 1922 as a vaudeville and movie house.

In 1940, the theatre was modernized and air-conditioned. Renamed the Century, the renovated interior of the new theatre still covers the original interior of the old Lyric. Another modernization in 1952 did little to save the Century from the same fate as all Hamilton's grand movie houses, and it closed in 1989.

Subsequently, the facade of the building with its semicircular Lyric logo was designated to be of heritage value by the City of Hamilton under the Ontario Heritage Act. Currently, the rest of the building is slated for demolition, to be rebuilt as condominiums.

Manson, Bill "Century (Lyric) Theatre". historical hamilton. Accessed June 26, 2017. historicalhamilton.com/beasley/century-(lyric)-theatre/

Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1913

To: 

1989

Location: 

Unlocated site, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_000)

Venue Views: 

Front View - Century

The Century Theatre - after closing

Photographer: Brian Kowalewicz


Hamilton Mechanics Hall

VenueListID: 

782

Overview: 

Address: 33 James St. N (pp.9)

Sutherland, J. City of Hamilton Directory for 1871-72. Containing Complete Alphabetical, Classified Business, and Street Directories. J. Sutherland, 1871.

Concerts were held 1850-80 in the second-floor auditorium of the Mechanics Hall (Hamilton, Ont), which could accommodate some 1000 people, and in several of the larger churches.

Hall,  Frederick A. "Music in Hamilton", The Canadian Encyclopedia, 12 May 2013, www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/hamilton-ont-emc/

Type: 

Multi-use


Mrs. Ferrie’s Grounds

VenueListID: 

828

Overview: 

Address: 13 Herkimer St. (pp.89)

Mitchell & Co. Mitchell & Co.'s County of Wentworth and Hamilton City Directory for 1865-6. Mitchell & Co., 1864.

www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780513_p2.pdf

Type: 

Private Residence

Location: 

Mrs. Ferrie's Grounds, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_007)


Oaklands

Oaklands.jpg

Overview: 

Address: Concession BF Lot 7

"Davidson, Charles." The Canadian County Atlas Digital Project. McGill University, 2001,

digital.library.mcgill.ca/countyatlas/showmap.php?Township=Flamboro+East&plotX=7359&plotY=1141&getMap.x=27&getMap.y=15

History:

"In 1791 William Applegarth emigrated from Durham county, England and settled in East Flamborough, receiving a Crown Grant of 900 acres of farmland in the Broken Front Concession, East Flamborough, which eventually became the Oaklands estate. He is said to have given the name Aldershot to the area formerly known as Burlington Plains. 

When his widowed daughter Sarah married Alexander Brown in 1842, she was given Lot 6 east of what is now La Salle Park Road and Part Lot 7. Her brother William Brown received the rest of Lot 7 and Lot 8

In 1889 the Oaklands house and 67 acres were sold to T. B. Townsend, who divided much of the land into lots for "villa residences with fruit", or market gardens. 

After his death his two daughters continued to lived on the estate. Emma Townsend lived there until she died in 1951."

"Oaklands, Aldershot, ca 1900" The Burlington Historical Society Digital Collections. Burlington Historical Society, vitacollections.ca/burlingtonhistoricalsociety/9030/data.

Type: 

Pleasure Gardens

Location: 

Oaklands, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_008)

Venue Views: 

Oaklands - Front View


Parlours over Ms. Warry's Variety Store

VenueListID: 

830

Overview: 

Address: 16 King St. West, Hamilton

"Warry, Miss E.R. Berlin wool repository, fancy goods, &c., 16 King west, h same." (pp.216)

Mitchell & Co. County of Wentworth and Hamilton City Directory for 1865-6. Mitchell & Co., 1864.

static.torontopubliclibrary.ca/da/pdfs/37131055373724d.pdf

Type: 

Multi-use

Location: 

Parlor’s above Miss Warry's Variety Store (1863), Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_010)


Princess Theatre Hamilton

Overview: 

Between 1907 and 1924 the theatre was known as the Wonderland, then the Colonial, the Princess Theatre, and finally the Tivoli.

Address: 108-110 James St. W (pp. 160)

Vernon, Henry. Vernon's City of Hamilton. Forty-Ninth Annual Street, Alphabetical, Business and Miscellaneous Directory for the year 1922. Henry Vernon & Son, 1922. 

static.torontopubliclibrary.ca/da/pdfs/vernonhamilton00vernuoft.pdf

"Built in stages between 1875 and 1924, the Tivoli complex originally housed a carriage factory, and then a small storefront nickelodeon in 1907. It opened in 1924 as a combination vaudeville and movie house. In 1995, it became a venue for live stage shows.

On June 29, [2004] a portion of the once-majestic, Second Empire-style theatre’s south wall and roof collapsed, forcing engineers to respond to its structural instability. The City took over the property to secure it and, in doing so, removed a number of elements including the third floor, the front wall, the cupola and light-bulb encrusted Tivoli marquee. In 2005, the Sniderman family, of Sam the Record Man fame, applied for a permit to demolish everything that remains, including the 750-seat theatre auditorium, which was designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act in 2004.

Where things stand

The Sniderman's sold the theatre in the mid-2000s for two dollars to Belma Gurdil-Diamante, CEO of the Canadian Ballet Youth Ensemble (CBYE). Unable to keep up the necessary repairs, the dance company sold the Tivoli for $900,000 in February 2013 to Gurdil-Diamante's husband, head of Diamante Investments, as part of a condo redevelopment plan.

According to Diamante, the project will include the restoration of the theatre--still used by CBYE--as a central component of the plan. "This is the signature last project that he's doing," reported Diamante's son to the CBC. "He wants to build something that he can look at and enjoy."

The goal is to donate it back to CBYE after restoration with a partnership plan that has yet to be worked out. The local arts community through the Tivoli Performing Arts Association is involved in the redevelopment plans.

Work is underway with City officials and architects, and plans will be shared with the public in early 2014.

UPDATE: Diamante Investments purchased the Tivoli in February 2013 with the goal of incorporating it into a condo-based redevelopment plan that will see the theatre restored.

UPDATE: In March 2015, city council approved Diamante Investments' proposal, which would see the Tivoli Theatre conserved as part of a 22-storey condiminium project that would include non-profit community space."

"Tivoli Theatre" National Trust for Canada. Mar 2015.

www.nationaltrustcanada.ca/issues-campaigns/top-ten-endangered/explore-past-listings/ontario/tivoli-theatre

Type: 

Theatre

From: 

1907

Current Status: 

Soon to become part of the Tivoli condominiums, in which the Tivoli theatre will be restored as non-profit community space.

Location: 

Princess Theatre, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_011)


Green, Jeff. "Tivoli 22-storey condo tower approved unanimously." CBC Hamilton. Mar 31, 2015.

www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/tivoli-22-storey-condo-tower-approved-unanimously-1.3016046

"Deal closes for downtown Tivoli Theatre". Hamilton Spectator. Mar 27, 2013.

www.thespec.com/news-story/2524936-deal-closes-for-downtown-tivoli-theatre

Vernon, Henry. Vernon's City of Hamilton. Forty-Ninth Annual Street, Alphabetical, Business and Miscellaneous Directory for the year 1922. Henry Vernon & Son, 1922.

static.torontopubliclibrary.ca/da/pdfs/vernonhamilton00vernuoft.pdf

"Tivoli Theatre" National Trust for Canada. Mar 2015.

www.nationaltrustcanada.ca/issues-campaigns/top-ten-endangered/explore-past-listings/ontario/tivoli-theatre


Royal Hotel Hamilton

Hotel Royal Hamilton.jpg
Royal Hotel Hamilton.jpg
Royal Hotel - lobby

Royal Hotel - lobby

VenueListID: 

819

Overview: 

Address: 79-87 James N. (pp.162)

Vernon's City of Hamilton Forty-Ninth Annual Street, Alphabetical, Business and Miscellaneous Directory for the Year 1922. Henry Vernon & Son, 1922. archive.org/stream/vernonhamilton00vernuoft#page/n3/mode/2up

Type: 

Hotel

Location: 

Royal Hotel, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_012)

Venue Views: 

Royal Hotel - Private Post Card - The Pugh Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto - Printed in England

Hotel Royal - Illustrated Post Card Co., Montreal

Rotunda Hotel Royal - Illustrated Post Card Co., Montreal

Source "Hotels in Hamilton, Ontario" Vintage Postcards of Hotels in Hamilton, Ontario. www.hamiltonpostcards.com/pages/hotels.html


St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal Church

Front View

Front View

Plaque

Plaque

VenueListID: 

861

Overview: 

 St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal Church

114 John Street North, Hamilton 

Currently known as Stewart Memorial Church

Founded c. 1835 as St. Paul's AME Church, Stewart Memorial Church represents the longest surviving predominantly Black congregation within the City of Hamilton. First housed in a log structure on Rebecca Street, just east of John Street North, the congregation acquired its present building in 1879. This modest clapboard church, erected in 1848, was remodelled c. 1905 with a Gothic Revival brick exterior.

One of the most prominent figures in the history of Stewart Memorial Church was the Reverend John C. Holland, who played an instrumental role in keeping the church open when the congregation was faced with financial difficulties during the Depression years. The decision in 1937 to sever ties with the African Methodist Episcopal body resulted in the formation of a non-denominational church, renamed in commemoration of the previous minister, Reverend Claude A. Stewart. 

The history of Stewart Memorial Church attests to the importance of the church as both a religious and social centre for Hamilton's community of African descent, beginning with the establishment of the earliest churches following the first influx of fugitive slaves into the Hamilton area in the 1820's.

Text of Ontario Heritage Plaque at 114 John Street North, Hamilton

"Stewart Memorial Church." Historical Perceptions. Robin McKee. www.hamiltonhistory.ca/stewart.html

Type: 

Church

From: 

1835

Current Status: 

Hours From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sundays only. All other times by appointment. Stewart Memorial Church is a wheelchair accessible heritage site. The exterior architecture features a neo-Gothic façade overlying the original clapboard structure. The interior is designated historical for its original pressed tin ceiling and dark wooden curved pews. A heritage corner is set up where photographs, pastors' roster and religious artifacts may be viewed. On the exterior west-facing wall, there is a bronze plaque designating the site of the first Canadian Masonic Lodge of Prince Hall Masons. It also illuminates the connection between the Prince Hall Masonic Order and the Underground Railroad. The Sunday service is held at 11 a.m. during the winter months and at 10:30 a.m. in the summer. The service features the regular singing of the plantation spirituals as they were passed down from the original members of the congregation who came to Hamilton along the Underground Railroad. The first pastor of the church – then known as St. Paul's African Methodist Episcopal Church – was the Rev. Josiah Henson. "Stewart Memorial Church." Slavery to Freedom. Ontario Heritage Trust. www.heritagetrust.on.ca/Slavery-to-Freedom/Partners/Stewart-Memorial-Church.aspx

Location: 

St. Paul's Church, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_013)


Temperance Hall Hamilton

VenueListID: 

820

Overview: 

Address: Lot 5, Concession 4

"James Miracle, one of the early settlers in Mount Hope obtained most of the land that now fronts onto Homestead Drive in 1845. Shortly after he subdivided the property into smaller lots and sold them for $100 each. In 1854, the subject property was sold to a Sons of Temperance organization who subsequently built a Temperance Hall on the property. The construction style and materials of the hall were not determined in the process of preparing this report. The organization owned the land until 1903. In 1903, the Township of Glanford purchased the property from the Sons of Temperance for $200. A year later Glanford Hall was constructed as the township council hall." (pp.9)

"Cultural Heritage Assessment Report (Char): Mount Hope Library; Former Glanford Community Hall; 3027 Homestead Drive; Part of Lot 5, Concession 4; Formerly Glanford, now Glanbrook Township; City of Hamilton, Ontario". Golder Associates. 25 July 2014. www.hamilton.ca/sites/default/files/media/browser/2015-06-10/glanfordhallchar20140725.pdf

Type: 

Lecture Hall

From: 

1854

To: 

1903

Location: 

Temperance Hall, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_014)


Theatre Royal Hamilton

VenueListID: 

791

Overview: 

Address: 6 Catherine Street

"12 September 1844, Hamilton: James Robertson applied to Board of Police for permission to rent 'Theatre Royal,' corner of King William and Catherine Street (first mention of Theatre Royal by name. Company may have been Mr. Rodney's, travelling from Kingston with plans of playing in Hamilton followed by two weeks in Toronto. (pp.300)

Plant, Richard. "Chronology: Theatre in Ontario to 1914." Early Stages: Theatres in Ontario 1800-1914. Editor: Ann Saddlemyer, University of Toronto Press, 1990.

Type: 

Theatre

Location: 

Theatre Royal, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_015)


Wesleyan Female College

VenueListID: 

827


Overview: 

Address: 59-65 King St. E (pp.60)

Sutherland, J. City of Hamilton Directory for 1871-2. Published Annually Containing Complete Alphabetical, Classified Business, and Street Directories. J. Sutherland, 1871. www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780515_p1.pdf

Type: 

Unknown

Location: 

Wesleyan Female College, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_016)


Wesleyan Methodist Brick Church

VenueListID: 

817

Overview: 

Address: 78-82 John St. N (pp.44)

Sutherland, J. City of Hamilton Directory for 1871-2. Published Annually Containing Complete Alphabetical, Classified Business, and Street Directories. J. Sutherland, 1871. www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/001075/f2/e010780515_p1.pdf

Type: 

Church

Location: 

Wesleyan Methodist Brick Church, Hamilton, Wentworth (wenthami00_017)